18 Mar, 2021

International Women’s Day

Today is March 7, International Women’s Day. Like other countries of the world, the day is being celebrated in Bangladesh with many formalities. The United Nations has set the theme of Women’s Day this year, ‘I am Equality of Generation: Awareness for Women’s Rights’. And in Bangladesh, the theme of the day has been determined by the government as ‘generation, equality, rights of all women’.

On March 8, a group of working-class women in a New York yarn factory protested against wage-discrimination, working hours and hostile workplaces. Angry at them, the oppressors attacked them. The first women’s conference was led by German socialist leader and politician Clara Zetkin in 9 after several incidents. The UN has been observing the day as a women’s day since its inception.

Every day there are various types of negative news, including torture, harassment and torture against women. There are still many pathways left for the advancement and dignity of women around the world. The demand for establishing women’s dignity as a man, regardless of political and economic system, is so universal. With the promise of building a world of co-partnership by eliminati

29 Feb, 2020

Happy Leap Day

Nearly every four years, we add an extra day to the calendar in the form of February 29, also known as Leap Day. Put simply, these additional 24 hours are built into the calendar to ensure that it stays in line with the Earth’s movement around the Sun. While the modern calendar contains 365 days, the actual time it takes for Earth to orbit its star is slightly longer—roughly 365.2421 days. The difference might seem negligible, but over decades and centuries that missing quarter of a day per year can add up. To ensure consistency with the true astronomical year, it is necessary to periodically add in an extra day to make up the lost time and get the calendar back in synch with the heavens.

1. Many ancient calendars had entire leap months

Many calendars, including the Hebrew, Chinese and Buddhist calendars, are lunisolar, meaning their dates indicate the position of the Moon as well as the position of Earth relative to the sun. Since there is a natural gap of roughly 11 days between a year as measured by lunar cycles and one measured by the Earth’s orbit, such calendars periodically require the addition of extra months, known as intercalary or interstitial months, to keep them on track.

Intercalary months, however, were not necessarily regular. Historians are still unclear as to how the early Romans kept track of their years, mostly because the Romans themselves may not have been entirely sure. It appears that the early Roman calendar consisted of ten months plus an ill-defined winter period, the varying length of which caused the calendar to become unpegged from the solar year. Eventually, this uncertain stretch of time was replaced by the new months of January and February, but the situation remained complicated. They employed a 23-day intercalary month known as Mercedonius to account for the difference between their year and the solar year, inserting it not between months but within the month of February for reasons that may have been related to lunar cycles.

To make matters even more confusing, the decision of when to hold Mercedonius often fell to the consuls, who used their ability to shorten or extend the year to their own political ends. As a result, by the time of Julius Caesar, the Roman year and the solar year were thoroughly out of sync.

2. Julius Caesar introduced Leap Day, with help from the Egyptians…

The Mercedonius-when-we-feel-like-it system apparently irked Caesar, the general-turned-consul-turned-dictator of Rome who drastically altered the course of European history. In addition to conquering Gaul and transforming Rome from a republic into an empire, Caesar re-ordered the Roman calendar, giving us the blueprint off of which much of the world still operates to this day.

During his time in Egypt, Caesar became convinced of the superiority of the Egyptian solar calendar, which featured 365 days and an occasional intercalary month which was inserted when astronomers observed the correct conditions in the stars. Caesar and the philosopher Sosigenes of Alexandria made one important modification: instead of relying on the stars, they would simply add a day to every fourth year. In keeping with the Roman tradition of messing with the length of February, that day would fall in the second month of the year—thus Leap Day was born. Caesar added two extra-long months to the year 46 BCE to make up for missed intercalations, and the Julian Calendar took effect on January 1st, 45 BCE.

3. …but their math was a little off

By the 16th century, scholars had noticed that time was still slipping—Caesar’s calculation that a year lasted 365.25 days was close, but still overestimated the solar year by 11 minutes. This was a problem for the Catholic Church, as the date of Easter had drifted away from its traditional place, the first Sunday after the first full moon following the vernal equinox, by roughly ten days. Pope Gregory XIII commissioned a modified calendar, one which kept Leap Day but accounted for the inaccuracy by eliminating it on centurial years not divisible by 400 (1700, 1800, and 1900 were not leap years, but 2000 was). The introduction of the Gregorian Calendar marked the last change to the Western calendar as we know it today.

Experts note that the Gregorian calculation of a solar year—365.2425 days—is still not perfect, and thus another correction will be necessary. Thankfully, the Gregorian calendar is only off by about one day every 3,030 years, so mankind has some time before this becomes a problem.

4. Leap Day is often associated with marriage, proposals and flipping gender roles

Curiously, many Leap Day customs have revolved around romance and marriage. Tradition holds that in 5th-century Ireland, St. Bridget lamented to St. Patrick that women were not allowed to propose marriage to men. So legend has it that St. Patrick designated the only day that does not occur annually, February 29, as a day on which women would be allowed to propose to men. In some places, Leap Day thus became known as Bachelor’s Day.

This tradition hopped the Irish Sea to Scotland and England, where the British added a twist—if a man rejected a woman’s proposal, he owed her a debt of several pairs of fine gloves, perhaps to hide the fact that she did not have an engagement ring. In Greek tradition, however, it is considered bad luck to marry on Leap Day, and statistics suggest that Greek couples continue to take this superstition seriously.

5. People born on Leap Day are called ‘Leaplings’

There are only about 5 million people in the whole world who were born on February 29, with the odds of being born on Leap Day standing at about 1-in-1,461. Several famous people—including actress and singer Dinah Shore (born 1916), motivational speaker Tony Robbins (born 1960) and hip-hop artist Ja Rule (born 1976)—are leaplings. Leaplings technically only get to celebrate their birthdays once every four years, but they do get to be part of an elite group.

20 Feb, 2020

Nation set to pay homage to language martyrs

The nation is set to observe the ‘Shaheed Dibash’ (Language Martyrs Day) and the International Mother Language Day on Friday with extensive programmes.

People from all walks of life will pay glowing tributes to the memories of language movement martyrs, the valiant sons of the soil who made supreme sacrifices to establish the rights of the mother tongue, Bangla, in 1952.

The day will also be observed around the world as the UNESCO recognised the 21 February as the International Mother Language Day on November 17, 1999.

The government has already taken extensive programmes to observe the ‘Shaheed Dibash’ and the International Mother Language Day on February 21 in a befitting manner.

The day is a public holiday.

In observance of the day in a befitting manner, the Central Shaheed Minar premises is being decorated with paintings, graffiti, buntings and selected verses on the mother language.

Four-tier security will be enforced around the main altar of the Shaheed Minar, its adjoining areas and Azimpur graveyard of the language martyrs.

President Abdul Hamid and Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina will lead the nation by paying homage to the Language Movement heroes by placing wreaths at the Central Shaheed Minar at one minute past zero hours.

The President and the Prime Minister issued separate messages on the eve of the day, paying glowing tributes to the martyrs of the historic Language Movement of 1952.

Different political-social-cultural-professional organisations will arrange various programmes, including seminars and cultural functions, to observe the Amar (immortal) Ekushey and International Mother Language Day in a befitting manner.

Quran Khwani and offering Fateha will be held at Azimpur graveyard in the city while prayers will be arranged at all worship places across the country seeking salvation of the departed souls of the martyrs of the Language Movement.

The programmes include placing of wreaths at the central Shaheed Minar at one-minute past zero hours (Thursday midnight), hoisting at half-mast the national and party flags at its offices across the country and Bangabandhu Bhaban and hoisting black flags in the morning, wearing black badges and placing wreaths on the graves of martyrs at Azimpur graveyard with Provat Feri as a mark of respect to the Language Movement martyrs.

In observance of the day, ruling Awami League would take a two-day programme.

The party will organise a discussion at Bangabandhu International Conference Centre in the city at 3 pm on February 22.

Awami League President and Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina is expected to chair the discussion.

Like previous years, Dhaka University (DU) authorities will organise the programmes at the Central Shaheed Minar in coordination with other relevant agencies.

National dailies will publish special supplements marking the day and Bangladesh Betar and Bangladesh Television and private radio stations and television channels will air special programmes on the occasion.

On February 21 in 1952, Salam, Rafique, Shafique, Jabbar and Barkat embraced martyrdom in police firing in front of the Dhaka Medical College and Hospital (DMCH) as they took to the street to intensify the campaign to establish Bangla as the state language of the then Pakistan, sowing the seeds of subsequent movements for the country’s independence.

They were killed as police opened fire on students, demonstrating under the All-Party Students Action Committee against conspiracies of Pakistani rulers to declare “Urdu” as the only state language.

The movement for Bangla, however, did not stop and Pakistan government on February 29, 1956 was compelled to recognise Bangla as one of the state languages besides Urdu.

The decision, however, could not stop the movement against repression and misrule of Pakistani government and subsequently led to the War of Independence and ultimately the emergence of Bangladesh.

13 Feb, 2020

Valentine’s Day

Valentine’s Day is celebrated on 14th February every year across the world. Largely a Western tradition, the day is now celebrated in a major way in the eastern part of the world as well in countries like India and China. The day is named after a Christian martyr Saint Valentine and is celebrated to commemorate the love between companions.

The day is believed to have been first incorporated by Pope Gelasius I in 496 AD. There were numerous martyrs named Valentine in the early years who were martyred for several reasons. However, none of them were associated with love. It was in the 14th century that a Valentine was associated with love and it is believed that the tradition of Valentine’s Day started with that particular Valentine.

However, there are several other theories as to the origins of Valentine’s Day. Some believe that the day was celebrated to respect a Saint Valentine when he refused to obey the orders of Emperor Claudius II. Emperor Claudius II had ordered that young men should refrain from marrying, as he believed that after marriage, men no longer remain good soldiers. However, the Valentine in question did not obey this order and helped many young men marry secretly. The Valentine was thus killed by the Emperor and hence, the tradition of Valentine’s Day was started.

The day is predominantly celebrated in Western countries but is beginning to make its presence in other countries as well. On this day, lovers exchange gifts and cards to profess their love for each other while single men and women go out in find of their valentine. Several clubs and discs organize special nights on this day which is accompanied by thumping music, candle light dinners and other romantic settings.

17 Oct, 2019

Upper Tahquamenon Falls in Michigan, USA

This blast of autumn colour comes from the uppers falls of Tahquamenon Falls, within a state park of the same name in Michigan, USA. The cascade has the nickname ‘Root Beer Falls’ due to the reddish-brown tint the water often takes. Cedar swamps upstream put a high concentration of tannins in the water, which causes the discolouration. And when autumn turns the leaves on the banks orange and crimson, the waterfall blends in nicely with the colour scheme.

1 May, 2019

The World’s Top Horse

There are several horse breeds in the world. Some of these breeds have continuously become the favorite among most people. In this article, we are going to give a list of the 10 most popular breeds in the wor

Arabian Horse

This is the most favorite horse for most people in the world. It originated from Arabian Peninsula, the breed has a distinctive head shape and proud tail carriage. The Arabian horse is said to be one of the oldest horse breeds in the world with archeological evidence suggesting that it dates back to 4500 years. It is also known for its endurance. Nowadays, Arabian horses are used in many ways such as saddle seat, dressage and western. The horse weighs around 850 – 1000 pounds with a highest of 57 – 61 inches.

Friesian Horse

This breed originated from Friesland in the Netherlands. It is known to be one of the most graceful horse breeds in the world. The horses were in demand, especially during the war. The horses are often found in black and have distinguishing characteristics. They are also used in stores and other disciplines. They are mostly a carriage horse and seen in dressage due to their attractive movement.

Thoroughbred Horse

This is the best-known horse breed for horse racing. The horse is known for its agility and spirit and speed. The horse was developed in England during the 17th and 18th century by combining the Arabian and Turkish horses. It has been used in various disciplines such as dressage, fox hunting, polo, and show jumping

Tennessee Walker

This is a tall horse with a long neck. It is described as the solidly built, elegant and refined horse breed. The breed was originally developed in the Southern USA to be used on plantations and farms. The Tennessee walker horse is known for its unique and flashy, running-walking movements. This made it comfortable to ride this horse for long distances and this made it the best choice for many War generals. Nowadays Tennessee Walking horses are used for pleasure mounts and as show horses.

 

 

23 Mar, 2019

Top Most Popular Asian Actresses

Aishwarya Rai
Aishwarya Rai is often referred to as the Indian Monica Belucci, and for a good reason. Apart from being absolutely stunning, Aishwarya knows several languages, which allowed her take part in various movies that incorporated English, Tamil and Bengali languages. In 1994 she got the title of the most beautiful woman in the world.Aishwarya Rai
Aishwarya Rai is often referred to as the Indian Monica Belucci, and for a good reason. Apart from being absolutely stunning, Aishwarya knows several languages, which allowed her take part in various movies that incorporated English, Tamil and Bengali languages. In 1994 she got the title of the most beautiful woman in the world.

Claudia Lynx
Often referred to as the Goddess of Persia, this singer, actress, model and translator is famous for her stunning beauty and all the charity work she has done over the years.
10-stunning-asian-actresses-no-man-can-resist2Cyrine Abdelnour
Cyrine is a famous Lebanese actress, model and singer. Prominent directors and producers were drawn to her beauty and she soon became the most demanded and highest paid actress in Lebanon.
10-stunning-asian-actresses-no-man-can-resist3a

Freida Pinto
Freida Pinto is not only an Indian actress and professional dancer – she also has a bachelor’s degree in arts and English literature. It seems that she can do everything!
10-stunning-asian-actresses-no-man-can-resist4

15 Jan, 2019

The dream land

The dream of living in another country can be very enticing, more so depending on where you currently live. Whether the political climate at home is getting hot or you simply crave new scenery, immigrating to another country represents a thrilling challenge that can offer innumerable life lessons and major personal growth.

8 Jan, 2019

China winter festival kicked off

Swimming enthusiast Yu Hongtao, 50, trained for months in the freezing water of the Songhua river to compete in a winter ice swimming tournament held annually in China’s northern city of Harbin, known for its bitterly cold weather.

“You have to start swimming from autumn so that the body can conquer the sudden icy impact on one’s cardio-vascular system,” said Yu, a Harbin resident. “The feeling of diving into the water is very cool.”

More than 300 men and women, wearing just ordinary trunks and swimsuits, on Saturday braved the bitter cold waters in the ice swimming meet, part of Harbin’s annual winter festival, among the biggest in the northern hemisphere.

Temperatures can plunge as low as 35 degrees Celsius below zero (minus 31 F) in the city in China’s Heilongjiang province.

The festival, which began on Saturday, has drawn millions of visitors from around the world every year since its inception in the early 1980s.

Highlights include sled rides on the Songhua river, mass weddings, and towering sculptures of ice and snow carved by thousands of artists and workers.

Visitors marvel at the mini ice replicas of the Colosseum and of the Milan Cathedral, particularly in the long evenings when soft, colored lights illuminate the sculptures.

The festival also attracts hordes of domestic tourists.

“The ice castles and sculptures made by workers are very impressive,” said Lin Renlong, who was visiting with his girlfriend.

“It’s like Disneyland, Disneyland in winter,” said the 22-year-old from the northern province of Hebei.

30 Dec, 2018

Royal Women Sirivannavari Of Thailand

Kate Middleton may have made headlines as the hottest commoner to become a member of England’s royal family, but all over the world there are other beautiful crowned women who go largely unacknowledged. Style, poise and impeccable taste in fashion set these ladies apart — jewels or no jewels on their heads.

Others on this list are known for exactly the opposite of Kate’s class and elegance… some of these royal women have indulged in pretty salacious behavior! Just because Kate might be more famous doesn’t mean she’s the most scandalous or controversial.
Sirivannavari Of Thailand

Princess Sirivannavari of Thailand was ranked among the 20 hottest royals by Forbes in 2009. Raised in the UK with her mother, she now resides in Thailand with her father and grandfather, the King. At 30 years old, she is an arts and sports enthusiast who is an active participant in the world of high fashion.